Legends in the Making

July 24, 2019 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm at The Guild
Next Generation Legends: A Mi’kmaq Heritage Actors Production

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Let us take you through a journey to show you the wonderful and amazing history of the Mi’kmaq here on PEI! It is a fun walk through our history by learning the stories of our people. We have a story about an eagle that causes the wind, a boy who grows up with bears, a little girl who learns to believe in herself, and many new legends and songs for 2019 season!! We do this every year because we are proud of our culture and our history, and by sharing it, we preserve it for the next generation.

Featuring Richard Pellissier-Lush, Sean Lush, Keegan Bernard, Caleb Acorn, Jessica Francis, Riley Bernard, Julie Pellissier-Lush.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse
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A Thin Line Between Life and Life on Stage

Art Imitates Life, or Life Imitates Art?

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Four of the characters in Watermark Theatre’s production of Boeing Boeing this summer begin the play engaged to be married and Artistic Director Robert Tsonos had no idea that two of the actors he cast to play the roles were also engaged to be married (but not to each other). “It’s one of those situations where art imitates life or vice versa”, says Tsonos. “The cast are all in their 20’s and early 30’s so I guess I shouldn’t have been so surprised”.

PEI actress Jenna Marie is engaged to Landon Holmes and will be married at the end of August. They met when they were 16 years old at one of Jenna Marie’s first jobs as a tour guide at Cows Creamery at the North River Causeway where Landon worked as a “Scoopervisor”. They became fast best friends, with a little help from the ice cream he would sneak to her, but weren’t romantic in any way, and when Landon left the Creamery they drifted apart. Over the next 7 years they kept in touch very little while Jenna Marie moved all over Canada, but when she returned back to PEI they decided to reconnect over a bowling game which quickly turned into their first date. One month after their first date Jenna Marie moved to Italy for 7 months, and they decided to do long distance. They talked every day, and despite the time change Landon would make sure to Skype her as she fell asleep almost every night. Landon decided to go to Italy and travel with Jenna Marie at the end of her time there and they fell deeper in love and became inseparable.

Toronto based actor Warren Bain is engaged to Katie Ryerson and will be married in January. They met after an evening performance of Macbeth in Prescott, Ontario while Warren was working at the St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival. They both went to the same theatre school, Warren was in his fourth year while Katie was in her first, and had seen each other in the hallways of the school but had never really chatted. They hit it off, had an enjoyable conversation, and made no plans to see each other ever again. The world works in mysterious ways though, and a few weeks later they ran into each other at Tarragon Theatre in Toronto. They committed to having a date the following week. They saw a show, dined at a local restaurant, then wandered the streets of Toronto, lost in thought, conversation, and that romantic atmosphere that only warm nights and street lights bring.

Playing characters that were also in love and ready to take the next step made both actors think about their own journeys. “Playing a fiancé in Boeing Boeing is so much fun, and it’s easy to be excited about being engaged to Bernard because I just think of how excited I am to marry Landon.” enthuses Jenna Marie, “Gloria is definitely a little more headstrong then I am, but Landon says that Gloria’s love of all food (and weird food combinations) is something that isn’t too far off from my tastes and I would have to agree!”

Warren also reflected on how the role has made him think of his own situation. “Getting ready and planning for a wedding really makes me appreciate the timetables and obsession with organization that Bernard has in Boeing Boeing, there’s so much to do, it could fall apart at any minute! Katie and I also both work as actors and our careers take us away from each other for long stretches of time. Spending the summer on the Island is wonderful, but it’s three months away from Katie, absence really does make the heart grow fonder.”

Boeing Boeing runs all summer until August 31st at the Watermark Theatre in North Rustico. Visit http://www.watermarktheatre.com or call 902-963-3963 for tickets.

Watermark is a proud member of the PTN – Professional Theatre Network of PEI

For more information please contact Andrea Surich at 902-963-3963 or generalmanager@watermarktheatre.com

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Hamlet Hits the Road

Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical to Embark on World Tour

Rights for The Charlottetown Festival-made musical acquired for stages across Canada, Australia, U.K. and more;

Final four more performances remain at Confederation Centre

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Confederation Centre of the Arts is excited to learn that David Carver Music has acquired the world-wide touring rights to the acclaimed Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical. The masterful stage musical balances high energy vocal and dance performances and rousing power ballads with songs reaching into the darker emotions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

This Saturday July 20, Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical wraps up a successful three week run in Charlottetown, P.E.I. “We are not surprised David Carver Music has picked up this show to go on tour,” says Confederation Centre CEO, Steve Bellamy. “The music is powerful and audiences have absolutely loved it during its run at The Charlottetown Festival. Confederation Centre of the Arts is thrilled that more people will be able to experience this exciting show in Canada and around the world!”

With a bright future ahead, Confederation Centre invites the public to come and celebrate this home-grown musical one last time before it prepares for audiences across the globe. The production, sponsored by SYSCO Food Services, is on stage now in the Homburg Theatre, with select dates and tickets still available. See full calendar and ticket info here. The title sponsor of The Charlottetown Festival is CIBC.

Audiences and critics alike have lauded the epic production, with extensive media attention drawn nationally from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Broadway World, the flagship CBC Radio program q, and the Canadian Press.

For over 30 years, David Carver Music (DCM) has been producing major concert tours with some of the biggest names in music, including Tom Petty, Aerosmith, Sheryl Crow, Bon Jovi, Bob Dylan, Bryan Adams, Brooks and Dunn, Bob Seger, and many more.

DCM’s 2020 tour is planned to visit theatres in Canada, Australia, the U.K., and the U.S. Complete tour dates and production information for this version of the production—dubbed Hamlet: The Rock Musical–will be announced in the months ahead from DCM.

Created by Cliff Jones, Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical first debuted at The Charlottetown Festival in 1974. The rock musical went on to take the nation by storm in the 1970’s and later became the first Canadian musical to play on Broadway, and later Los Angeles. In 2019, Kronborg returned, reimagined and re-orchestrated by Director Mary Francis Moore and Musical Director Craig Fair.

Confederation Centre wishes to acknowledge the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Government of P.E.I., and the City of Charlottetown for their continued support.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Seeing Where You Are (While You Can)

Only two more weeks to see Where You Are!

Playing until Sunday, July 28

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“The Victoria Playhouse consistently offers divine theatre experiences and the 2019 production of Where You Are, persists in this tradition, providing lucky audiences with a witty and contemplative analgesic to the mundane.” – Norah Pendergast for The Buzz.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Taking Up the Reins at the Centre

Confederation Centre is excited to welcome Kelly Dawson as our new Chief Operations Officer.

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With over 20 years of experience, Kelly has spent most of her career in senior management roles serving organizations in various industries including Municipalities, Utilities, Manufacturing, Healthcare, and, most recently, Higher Education.

Give her a big welcome if you see her around our building!

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Meanwhile in Ward 16

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No doubt about it. Ward 16 is the city’s embarrassing problem child. That doesn’t stop long-time incumbent City Councillor Jamie Cox from scheming and planning and doing whatever it takes to make Ward 16 the best it can be.

Partly scripted, partly improvised, Meanwhile in Ward 16 (A Charlottetown Soap Opera) is a six-part comedy serial playing Saturday nights this summer at The Guild. Following the exploits of some of the ward’s more eccentric and odd characters, each episode features its own plots and twists while also encompassing a larger season-long story arc. Come for one show, come for them all; every episode is different, and all are sure to entertain.

Featuring Graham Putnam, Rob MacDonald, Nancy McLure, Kassinda Bulger, Cameron MacDonald, along with weekly special guests. Meanwhile in Ward 16 is proud to have McLean’s Overhead Garage Doors as title sponsor.

 

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Six Oysters Ahoy

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“He was a very valiant man who first adventured on the eating of oysters.”  King James VI and I

“I checked the weather report,” said Frank Glass.

“What did you find out?” asked Vera Glass.

“It’s going to be the same today as it was yesterday.”

“Is it going to rain all day?” asked Vera.

“You don’t need a weatherman for that,” said Frank, throwing a glance at the window.

A steady rain was falling outside the large front window of the cottage, down on the long sloping lawn of the Coastline Cottages, on the Gulf Shore Parkway, on the three houses on the other side of the road, and out to the horizon as far as they could see. The sky was dark over Doyle’s Cove. Broad surfboard-sized waves worked up the water. When Frank looked out the northwest-facing kitchen window, the sky, where the weather was coming from, was even darker.

“What should we do? It rained all day yesterday. I’m getting cabin fever.”

“We could play cards, read, and talk among ourselves. How about dinner and a show?”

“That sounds good, especially the part about dinner,” said Vera. “Where do you want to eat?”

“There’s a show opening tonight at the Victoria Theatre.”

“All right, but what about dinner?”

“We could eat at the Landmark, it’s right there.”

“I’ve always liked the Landmark,” said Vera. “Eugene is a great cook. They have the best meat pies.”

“Somebody told me he sold it and there are new owners,” said Frank.

“What? How can that be? Eugene and Olivier and Rachel are gone?”

The Sauve family tree had repurposed an old grocery store in Victoria into a café restaurant in the late 1980s, adding a deck, digging a basement for storage and coolers, and expanding their dining space several times. They were a perennial ‘Best Place to Eat on Prince Edward Island’ in the magazine Canadian Living.

“It’s now called the Landmark Oyster House.”

“I love oysters,” said Vera. “Let’s go.”

It was still raining when Frank and Vera drove up Church Hill Road and swung onto Route 6, through North Rustico to Route 13, through Hunter River and Kelly’s Cross. It was still raining when they pulled into the small seaside town of Victoria on the other side of Prince Edward Island, on the Northumberland Straight side, 45 minutes later. It rained on them as they rushed into the Landmark Oyster House.

There wasn’t a table to be had, but there were two seats at the bar.

“Look, we’re right in front of the oysters,” said Vera, as they sat down at the closed end of it. “I love this spot.”

Kieran Goodwin, the bartender, agreed, standing on the other side of the bar, on the other side of a large shallow stainless steel bin full of raw oysters on ice.

“Best seats in the house,” he said. “They were going to put the bar in the front room, but the dimensions didn’t work out.”

“Who’s they?” asked Frank.

Vera looked the chalkboard on the wall up and down. The names of the oysters on ice were written on the board. There were six of them, Valley Pearl, Sand Dune, Shipwreck, Blackberry Point, Lucky Limes, and Dukes. She looked down into the bin. She couldn’t make heads or tails of which were which. She knew raw oysters were alive, more-or-less.

She wondered, how could you even tell?

“Greg and Marly Anderson,” said Kieran. “They own a wedding venue up the road.”  It is the Grand Victoria Wedding Events Venue, in a restored former 19th century church. “When this opportunity came up, when Eugene was looking to tone it down a bit, they decided to purchase it.”

“I worked at the Oyster House in Charlottetown shucking oysters for almost five years,” said Marly. “We heard that the family wanted to retire because they had been working at this restaurant for 29 years. We already felt a connection to this place and we are friends and neighbors with the family.”

“They’ve put their roots down in the community, are making their stand here,” said Kieran.

“I like what they’ve done in here, casual but upscale,” said Vera.

“It looks like the kitchen is more enclosed than it was,” observed Frank.

“Yeah, they did up a wall,” said Kieran. “When you used to walk in, you could peek right in.”

“I remember Eugene telling us once he learned all his cooking from his mom. Who does the cooking now?”

“Kaela Barnett is our chef.”

“We couldn’t do this without her,” said Greg Anderson.

“I’m thinking of doing oysters and a board,” said Vera.

“That’s a good choice,” said Kieran. “I recommend the large board. You get a bit of everything. I personally like getting some cheese.”

“Me, too.”

“Are you oyster connoisseurs?” asked Kieran.

“Not me,” said Frank. “I can’t remember the last time I ate an oyster.”

“I wish I was, but I love them,” said Vera. “We were on the island last year and went to the Merchantman in Charlottetown with Doug and Rachel, Eugene’s daughter. We had oysters and she went through all the ones we ate, explaining them to me.”

“Would you like something from the bar?” asked Kieran.

“I’ll take the Gahan on tap, the 1772 Pale Ale.”

“What wine goes with oysters?” asked Vera.

“We have a beautiful California chardonnay,” said Kieran. “It’s great with shellfish. I recommend it.”

“This is good, fruity,” said Vera, tasting it.

“We have six oysters,” said Kieran. “You could do one of each.”

“That’s what I’ll do,” said Vera.

“I think I’ll have the seafood chowder and some of the board,” said Frank.

“Oh, Frank, try one,” said Vera.

“Lucky Limes are my favorite,” said Kieran. “It’s a good medium oyster.”

“OK, I’ll try it,” said Frank, shrugging.

Kieran handed him a Lucky Lime.

“How do I eat this thing?” Frank asked Vera.

“Sometimes I chew it, sometimes I don’t,” she said.

“Some people like putting stuff on it, like horseradish, which kills the taste,” said Kieran. “But straight up is best. That’s how islanders do it, just shuck it.”

Frank looked down at the liquid-filled half shell.

“From the wide end,” said Kieran.

He slurped the oyster into his mouth and swallowed it.

“Now you’re a pro,” said Vera.

“That wasn’t bad,” said Frank. “How could you tell it was a Lucky Lime? They all look the same to me.”

“If you look at the chalkboard, it’s one through six. That’s one way.”

“Can you tell by looking at them?” asked Vera.

“I can tell by the shell,” said Kieran. “The ones that are more green, that means there’s more saltwater content. So this is a Sand Dune, quite briny. That one is almost straight salt water.” He pointed to an even darker greener shell.

“The Shipwreck, the name made me nervous to have it, but it was mild,” said Vera.

“It would be farther up the estuary, closer to fresh water.”

“Blackberry Point was very salty.”

“The Blackberry’s are from Malpeque, which is near Cavendish,” said Kieran. “The Sand Dune is from Surrey, down east, and the Lucky Limes are from New London Bay. Valley Pearl is from Pine Valley and the Dukes are from Ten Mile Creek.”

“I thought you were just making all this up,” said Frank.

“No, its like wine,” said Kieran.

“How did you get into the shellfish racket?” asked Frank.

“I graduated in business, traveled, lived in New Zealand and Australia, and then came back home, and worked in a bank as a financial advisor for six years, in Summerside and Charlottetown, but then I just got tired of working in a bank, and went back to school.”

“How did you find your way here, behind the bar?”

“I date Jamie, who is Marly’s sister.”

“Are those pickled carrots?” asked Vera, pointing at the charcuterie board in front of her.

“Yes, and you have raisin jam, too,” said Kieran.

“Chutney, stop the madness!” exclaimed Vera. “Oh, it’s strawberry jam. It just looks like chutney. It’s delicious.”

“We had raisin pie at a small diner in Hunter River the other day,” said Frank.

“The one by the side of the road, up from the Irving gas station?” asked Kieran.

“That’s the one,” said Frank. “The waitress told us she always thinks of raisin pie as funeral pie, because back in the day, if there was a funeral in the winter, women always made raisin pies for the reception after the memorial service, because raisins kept all year round.”

“Can I take my oyster shells with me?” asked Vera.

“Sure,” said Kieran. ”We can get a little bag for you.”

“You can really taste the sea eating oysters,” said Vera. “Blackberry Point was a little thin and too salty, but once you eat one, and you don’t like it, whoa, what are you going to do? Valley Pearl didn’t have a lot of flavor, but there was some good texture to it. Lucky Lime was very good. My favorite was Sand Dune. It had a strong ocean flavor, briny.”

“I’ve heard people say oysters are slimy, but the one I had, it didn’t seem that way,” said Frank. “I can see having oysters again.”

“Don’t people sometimes say the world is your oyster?” said Vera.

“Do you want dessert?” asked Kieran.

“Do you have carrot cake?”

“It’s made here.”

“We’ll split a slice of that, and two coffees, thanks.”

As Vera and Frank dug into their carrot cake, there was a commotion at the other end of the bar. Kieran, Jamie, and Marly were huddling over glowing screens.

“Did your electronics go haywire?” asked Frank when Kieran brought them coffee.

“The microwave in the basement tripped the breaker. We hardly ever use it, except to melt butter sometimes. It’s weird, it’s been working until now. We have a thing that magnifies our wi-fi signal. We just found out it’s on the same circuit, for some reason.”

“My mother was a pastry chef,” said Vera. ”She didn’t use microwaves much, but whenever she did, she always said, ‘I’m going to nuke it now!’”

Frank and Vera used their forks on the last crumbs of their cake and finished their coffee. Frank checked the time on his iPhone. “Time to go, sweetheart,” he said. They paid the bill and stood to go.

“Enjoy the show, hope to see you again,” Kieran said as Frank and Vera walked out of the Oyster House.

“It’s raining and sunny at the same time,” said Frank as they dashed across the street to the Victoria Theatre, yellow slanting sunlight leading the way.

“That’s PEI for you,” said Vera. “By the way, what are we seeing?”

“Where You Are.”

“I know where we are,” said Vera.

“That’s the name of the show,” said Frank.

“Aha, I see,” said Vera.

“Hustle it up, we’re almost late.”

They went up the steps into the theater, got their programs, and sat down. Vera tucked the bag of shells under her seat. “Wherever you are, there you are, oyster boys and girls” she thought, making sure they were safe and sound.

“How could you even tell?” she wondered as the lights went down and the show started.

Photograph by Vanessa Staskus

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse