Book of Canadian Hope Arrives

At sunrise on July 1, 2017, A Book of Canadian Hope/ Un livre d’espoir canadien was presented to the Premier of Prince Edward Island with a request that it be sealed in the building and be opened on this day in 2167.

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The book arrived by canoe carried by Mi’kmaq Legend leader, Julie Pelletier-Lush. Elder Thirley Levi led a smudging ceremony which was followed by a silent walk during which participants made wishes for the future. The path traced the steps of those who attended the 1864 Charlottetown Conference. At Province House, Julie will give a copy of the book to Premier Wade MacLauchlan with a request that it be sealed in the walls of Province House to be opened and read to our descendants on this day, 2167.

A Book of Canadian Hope/Un livre d’espoir canadien completes a project created by PEI’s Watermark Theatre. Nine short plays designed to help express what Canadians wished for the next 150 years were commissioned. Between January and May 2015, the plays toured to 21 cities and created conversations with more than 8000 people.

Three wishes expressed in every session were identified and a partnership with the Palmer Conference on Public Policy at the University of Prince Edward Island in September 2015 was made. This led to an exploration by world experts on how we can start to make these wishes come true for our descendants.

The Book contains samples of how we live, love and care for our country today in excerpts from the plays, curated samples of the wishes made, photographs from throughout the journey and excerpts from advice given at the Palmer Conference. A limited number of first edition copies will be available for $29.95 by writing to info@watermarktheatre.com and selected outlets in Prince Edward Island.

All proceeds go to the non-profit Watermark Theatre.

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Centre 150

Canada turns 150 in 2017 – why not come to Canada’s birthplace to celebrate? In 1864, delegates to the Charlottetown Conference came up with an interesting concept – why not merge the colonies and form a country? A series of meetings and conferences followed and on July 1, 1867 the Dominion of Canada was declared.

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Charlottetown is proud of its role as Canada’s Birthplace and the activities planned for our 150th birthday revolve around the country’s origins, its current standing especially in the arts, and our future as a great nation. Most of the action will take place in and around Confederation Centre of the Arts, located right in the heart of Charlottetown.

Built in 1964 to commemorate the Charlottetown Conference, Confederation Centre has a mission to “inspire Canadians through heritage and the arts to celebrate the origins and evolution of Canada.”