Not Forgotten, In Remembrance

Sobeys LIVE @ the Centre Presents ‘In Remembrance’ at Historic Trinity United

Annual Remembrance Day concert will be performed by the Confederation Singers and Confederation Centre Youth Chorus

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The Confederation Singers and the Confederation Centre Youth Chorus will present a recital of choral music and readings in honour of the nation’s war veterans. Also marking the 100th Anniversary of the end of the First World War. In Remembrance takes place Sunday, November 11, at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity United Church in Charlottetown.

In Remembrance offers an evening of thought-provoking poetry complemented by appropriate selections of choral music; one reflects and heightens the other,” offers Don Fraser, director of choral music at Confederation Centre. “Much of the poetry is from the First World War, and included in the music is a Canadian choral setting of the famous In Flanders Fieldspoem.”

The concert will also feature the selection ‘I’m Dreaming of Home’, which members of the Youth Chorus performed at the dedication ceremony for the newly restored Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France on April 9, 2007, the 90th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

Other featured music selections include: Eric Whitacre’s ‘Sleep’; ‘In Remembrance’ from Canadian composer Eleanor Daley; ‘The Road Not Taken’ by Randall Thompson; the beautiful ‘Pie Jesu’ by Fauré; and ‘Ubi Caritas’ by Ola Gjeilo.

Tickets for the annual In Remembrance performance are $15 and are available at the door or via the Confederation Centre’s box office. Patrons can also order at 902-566-1267, toll free at 1-800-565-0278, or online at confederationcentre.com.

Appreciation is extended to Maritime Electric, program sponsors for the Choral Music Programme, as well as to Sobeys, the title sponsor for LIVE @ the Centre! Media sponsors are The Guardian, Hot 105.5 and Ocean 100.

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Head in the Sand at the Victoria Playhouse

Matt Murray’s Uproariously Funny Play

Myth of the Ostrich

When Pam finds a letter from her teenage son to his sweetheart, she turns up unannounced to discuss matters with the other teen’s mother Holly. What begins pleasantly enough soon becomes a complicated, bizarre, and hilarious roller-coaster ride of misunderstandings. The confusion only escalates with the arrival of Holly’s outrageous and filter-less friend, Cheryl.

Previews Saturday, August 4th  
Opens Sunday, August 5th 
Tuesday – Sunday until September 2nd

The Buzz By Brazier

 What’s the buzz, tell me what’s happenin”… iconic rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar opens June 7 at The 2018 Charlottetown Festival.

If you are one of the thousands of long-time fans of the musical, you will be interested in hearing more about the back-story of the origins and shaping of the ground-breaking production. If you didn’t live through the 70s belting out the soundtrack, this is a wonderful opportunity to hear more about this timeless, universal story with a modern twist that explores the last week of Jesus’ life as seen through the troubled eyes of Judas Iscariot.  

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Please join The Charlottetown Festival’s Artistic Director, Adam Brazier, on April 18 at 7:00 p.m. in the Confederation Centre Library for “Director’s Cut – Jesus Christ Superstar.”

Adam will discuss the production’s history, rich themes, and the challenges he faced adapting Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s musical for the Homburg stage.

Admission is free. Please RSVP by emailing Kara Hughes at khughes@confederationcentre.com.

Get In On the Action

Call For Submissions
INTERNSHIPS AT WATERMARK THEATRE FOR 2018 SEASON

Watermark Theatre is thrilled to embark on its third year of the Watermark Mentorship Project continuing to train young theatre artists headed for careers in the theatre. This season, experienced professionals will train interns in the following departments: stage management, scenic art/properties, wardrobe, carpentry/tech, and arts administration.

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Watermark Theatre is a perfect training ground; small enough to nurture and large enough to have processes and policies in place. All sets, costumes and props are realized on site and production standards are high. Though there are many theatre training institutions in Canada there are very few internships available. Hands-on experience and training under a good mentor is one of the best ways to learn and grow.

5 Internships available in:  Stage Management or Carpentry/Tech or Wardrobe or Props/Scenic Art or Arts Administration Assistant

Dates for all 5 Internships:  May to September 2018

The Placements:   Will include safety orientation, an introduction to the workings of a small repertory theatre and preparing the production departments for the season. Under the supervision of highly experienced Mentors, the interns will realise the productions to the high standards expected at Watermark Theatre. Opportunities for learning will be dependent on the needs of the productions. Workshops when possible or necessary will be scheduled.  There may be opportunities to take on a leadership role on projects through an evaluation with the Mentor and the General Manager.  The Interns will also work backstage or in the booth for the run of the productions.  Opportunities to work on other Watermark Theatre initiatives will be scheduled throughout the summer.

Eligibility:

· A student or graduate of a theatre school programme or university equivalent and/or have applicable work experience – i.e. experience in non-professional theatre or the music industry.

· Creative, curious and passionate about theatre.

· Able to work well in a team environment

Funding models may require either an open EI claim or eligibility to open an EI claim or students between the ages of 18-30 returning to school post internship.

Watermark Theatre is an equal opportunity employer, and encourages applications from all qualified candidates.  Please respond by e-mail with a formal cover letter and resume by: Monday, March 5, 2018

 

Rockin’ in Memphis

If it weren’t for the rocks in its bed, the stream would have no song. ~ Carl Perkins

Blue Suede Shoes opened things up. The set was a border of light featuring a recording studio full of gold records & vintage instruments. I couldn’t miss this Opening Night & I was not disappointed with this picture perfect Charlottetown Festival musical celebration last Friday!

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Million Dollar Quartet had a great storyline centred around Sam Phillips’ (played by Stephen Guy-McGrath) Sun Records, 4 legends from the 50’s and loyalty to the man who got them to the top of the game when Rock n’ Roll was in its infancy. A young up and coming Jerry Lee Lewis (Jefferson McDonald) was a Real Wild Child and was my personal favorite of the Quartet. He was outspoken and matched his over the edge comedy with high adrenaline musical portrayals of his best known songs.

The King of Rockabilly, Carl Perkins (Ed Murphy) had something to prove and played some awesome licks on the guitar, Man in Black Johnny Cash (Greg Gale) walked the line with a heavy heart, & The King Elvis Presley, (who was accompanied by his girl Dyanne (Alicia Toner), was the guest of honor.

Some of my favorite performances included Who Do You Love? By Perkins, That’s All Right by Presley, Fever by Dyanne, I Walk the Line by Cash, & of course, Great Balls of Fire by Lewis.

The players had the moves, the look, and most notably, the musical ability to make me believe I was transported in time to Memphis for an inside look at a session like no other. Great tunes, and a fast paced sentimental journey music fans of any generation can appreciate in a 1 act masterpiece. It is definitely happening at The Confederation Centre in Charlottetown in 2017!

 

Written by Cindy Lapena.

Originally posted on http://www.onrpei.ca. Used by permission.

What Lori MacDonald Said About Robyn Hood

We loved Robyn Hood! Every year we go to the Christmas shows and have always enjoyed each and every one! Mamma Mia, Anne of GG, Alice Through the Looking Glass, of course, were amazing too!

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Great performances, witty and fun! We are so fortunate to have Confederation Centre here in Charlottetown!

Rockin’ Robyn

When I first heard of the production Robyn Hood from one of my students in Seniors College, I thought it sounded like quite a riot, considering the play had a cast of 75—Charlottetown’s version of a cast of thousands—and the script by Adam Brazier and Graham Putnam wove several stories together with contributions from the cast. One must certainly investigate a claim of that magnitude. After opening night at the Homburg Theatre, I can say with certainty the claim is completely true.

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The Confederation Centre of the Arts kicked off the Christmas season with Robyn Hood, a comic musical adaptation of the legend of Robin Hood of Sherwood Forest, except this time, Robyn is a woman out to defeat the power-hungry Prince John of the Kingdom of Charlottetown. Maria Campbell, an alumna of the Confederation Centre Young Company, belted out a charmingly exuberant Robyn Hood supported all throughout by Friar Tuck, played Alana Bridgewater, whose powerful and lovely voice filled the theatre—the two were perfectly matched singing together.

Not to be outdone was Maid Marian, played by Jessica Gallant, who matched the mood with her music as she tried to solve her dilemma: to betray or not to betray? Sarah MacPhee’s signature Town Crier role was resurrected yet once again and given the opportunity to rise in the ranks, thanks to Matt Rainnie’s dastardly pouting Prince John’s machinations. He was joined on stage by his two daughters in the Charlottetown ensemble impoverished by being taxed to the max by Prince John.

The numerous scenes offered multiple opportunities to shift around the cast of 75—filling the stage was certainly not a problem in this production. Although the production was not technically perfect, the minute slips here and there were easily covered up by the ribaldry and jokes that spared no one. A great deal of the humor, however, is strictly local and anyone who is not familiar with PEI culture might not understand why people were laughing. There was a generous dose of tongue-in-cheek wit throughout the play and even the songs were selected from a wide range of sources to provide a lively musical tapestry.

Besides the occasional dancer with lower energy levels, the performance was bursting with rollicking fun. Garnett Gallant’s set design was just right and I wonder if anyone else picked up on the bit of irony with the Bundy clock, guitar, golf cart, and Maid Marian’s selfie during the wild chase through the Christmas-lit forest, not to mention the occasional hand microphone appearing on stage after Friar Tuck declared the play would bring us back to a time before cellphones, iPads, and Netflix! Deliberate or not, inconsistencies aside, it all added up to a great deal of fun that might have started a tad slow but certainly built up to a rousing end.

If you’re in for some Christmas cheer, this is just the performance to see!

Review by Cindy Lapena. Used by permission. Originally posted on http://www.onrpei.com.