Get to the Glory Hole at the Guild

Glory Hole: The Sexy Sex Art Show opens at the Gallery at the Guild in
Charlottetown from 7 to 9 pm on Wednesday, November 8 th .
Laura Chapin, Susana Rutherford, Dave Stewart and Jenni Zelin are the co-curators of the multi-
artist exhibit. In a release, the curators note that the show aims to positively and playfully
celebrate sexuality through diverse perspectives and mediums. It focuses on its “exciting, silly,
messy, inspirational and creative aspects”.
Over by the Car
“It’s a matter of being able to participate in something the artists believe in,” says Rutherford.
“Sex is something we still get very much hung up about, but it’s one of the fundamental aspects
of being human for most of us. To talk about it, to create artwork that reflects it, is to invite
conversation and reaction, but we’re aiming to keep that all very much in the positive.”
“The Sexy Sex Art Show, the subtitle of the show, says it all,” adds Zelin. “It indicates its playful
nature, and it lets people know what the theme of the exhibit is, so anyone who might be
offended by the topic is forewarned. We’ve made a point of stressing that in all our
communications about the show.”
More than twenty Island artists are participating in the show. Some are free to exhibit under
their names, while others will use pseudonyms or exhibit anonymously.
“Really, what we’re hoping for here,” Rutherford concludes, “is to give artists a challenge in
expressing this theme, and to give viewers an entertaining, and hopefully thought-provoking
tour of a key piece of the human experience.”
Admission to the exhibition is free, and adult accompaniment is recommended for children 14
and under. The show runs through Saturday, December 2.
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Out of the Chill

Art lovers come out of the chill and into the warmth of the Gallery this November.  Whether it’s learning about the history of Canadian Art or understanding the operation of a CCAG, we have you covered with two series of ArtTalks. Short, noon-hour talks with various gallery staff members providing presentation on their role at the gallery, a current research project, or a work of art in the RE:collection exhibition. Secondly, three evening talks by Art historian, Ron Hawker will delve into Canadian art history.

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Hawker’s series, Understanding Canadian Art, will be presented on November 2 &16 (in the Gallery) and November 30 (in the Centre’s Studio 1) at 7pm and cover the following themes:  From Colony to Confederation; Confederation to World War II; Modern to Post-Modern.

Dr. Hawker relocated to the Island in 2016. He has taught at the Alberta College of Art and Design, the University of British Columbia, Emily Carr University of Art and Design, the American University of Sharjah, and Zayed University in Dubai. He is the author of Tales of Ghosts: First Nations Art in British Columbia, 1922-1961 (University of British Columbia Press 2002), Traditional Architecture in the Arabian Gulf: Building on Desert Tides (Wessex Institute of Technology Press, 2008), and Yakuglas’ Legacy: The Art and Times of Charlie James (University of Toronto Press, 2016).

The full description of each week’s topic including the staff noon talks, starting November 1, can be found on the website at http://www.confederationcentre.com/en/gallery-events.php

Stones Roll in to the Guild

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Stones and Things–a show of sculpture by Tom Connor — will take place at The Guild, September 13 to 24. Pieces range from 5 feet high to hand size. Most are in various types of stone.

This will be Connor’s second solo showing at The Guild, with all new pieces. He has also shown at the Ringling Gallery in Longboat Key, Florida, where he was awarded Honorable Mention two years running.

The opening reception will be Wednesday, 13 September, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. All are invited.

Mother Daughter Art Show Opens

A new PEI artist, Barbara MacLeod, will be having her first art show from August 30 to September 10 at The Gallery at the Guild.
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Barb spent most of her career as a retail entrepreneur, opening Whipper Snapper, The Fun Toy Store, and The Uncommon Grocer in Charlottetown. Over the past 5 years, painting has become a big part of her life. Influenced by her mother who passed away in 2002, picking up a paintbrush didn’t seem like a big leap.

Gallery Unveils New Commission

Anishnaabe artist, Robert Houle, a member of the Sandy Bay First Nation, near Winnipeg, Manitoba, recently attended the opening of the Confederation Centre Art Gallery’s major permanent collection exhibition, RE:collection, and made introductory remarks and presented a public art talk on his 2017 painting, O-ween du muh waun (We were Told). 

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Commissioned by the Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CCAG) to mark the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, with funds from the A.G. and Eliza Jane Ramsden Endowment Fund, Houle’s oil on canvas triptych is a very timely consideration of the long First Nation’s presence in this land and more generally the idea of history painting.

Houle’s work is a major addition to the Gallery’s collection and specifically the Confederation Murals Series, which includes works by Jean Paul Lemieux, John Fox, and Jack Shadbolt, commissioned in 1964, and work by Jane Ash Poitras, Yvon Gallant, and Wanda Koop commissioned in the 1990s.

Houle’s new painting is a further elaboration on his 1992 work, Kanata (collection of the National Gallery of Canada), in which he appropriates and reimagines the composition of Benjamin West’s 1770 painting, The Death of General Wolfe. West’s painting famously mythologized the battlefield death of the British general who led his troops to victory in the 1759 Battle of Quebec. Houle drew all the figures in West’s composition in conté, reserving colour for only the Indigenous figure in the foreground.

In his new work, O-ween du muh waun (We were Told) Houle focuses exclusively on this same Delaware warrior figure, seated on the Plains of Abraham, and facing east. He eliminates all the other figures from West’s composition. Like much of Houle’s work, O-ween du muh waun (We were Told) addresses current political and cultural issues by looking to history. As Canada looks towards a reconciliation with First Nations, Houle’s painting stands as an important marker within the CCAG’s collection and the RE:collectionexhibition as it explores the building of a Canadian art collection as an optimistic mission and a reflection on the evolving country, its history, geography, people and communities.

“The [Canada] 150 idea was not an issue for me, but rather a correction to clarify that my sense of country dates back further than 1867,” Houle offers, explaining his visions around the new work. “Our friendship and numbered treaties are also preceded by the presence of our ancestors going back millennia; as well as the whole question of the historical painting by such artists as Benjamin West.”

Houle was born in St. Boniface, Manitoba, in 1947 and currently resides in Toronto. He is widely acclaimed for bridging Indigenous history and contemporary art. In 2015 he received the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Art for his significant contributions to Canadian art.

O-ween du muh waun (We Were Told) is on display in Upper West Gallery at the CCAG until December 31.

Roaming the Town

Over by the Car (20)
The streets of Charlottetown hold many visual opportunities for an artist. Though small in size, the city offers a variety of unique scenes; from the rotting wood shingles of a weathered home, to the pristine facade of a new complex. But for all its progress, Charlottetown holds value in maintaining the impression of the past. But there is no denying that this gradual, ever-changing scape will someday make this city unrecognizable. Roam is an exhibition of 20+ art pieces by artist David Garcia Jimenez. The show will feature mainly acrylic works that showcase candid scenes throughout the city. Roam is at the Guild through July 31st.