Tag Archives: Confederation Centre Art Gallery

The Debbie Show

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Views from the Desk

After almost 24 years of greeting gallery guests, and witnessing close to 50 percent of the exhibitions mounted in the gallery, receptionist Debbie Muttart shares her favourite pieces from the vault of the art gallery.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

All Things Burke

Brian Burke Film Screenings, Book Launch and ArtTalk

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It’s all things Brian Burke in December at the Gallery. First up is a noontime screening of Brian Pollard’s film Figure in a Landscape on Wednesday, December 4 at 12:05 p.m. On Thursday, December 12 we will screen the Brian Pollard/William Herrington film Portraits: Many Years Later and launch our latest art catalogue Predicaments: Brian Burke, a retrospective. And we’re not stopping there. On Sunday, January 5at 2 p.m., Curator Pan Wendt will close out the Burke show with an ArtTalk. These events are FREE and everyone is welcome to attend.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Calling All Craftspeople

Call for Proposals

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Calling all Craftspeople!
The Art Gallery and the PEI Crafts Council are collaborating on a fine craft exhibition, Creative Obsession, slated for summer 2020 in the Gallery. Interested artisans should submit their proposal on work they want considered for the exhibition to tsteele@confederationcentre.com or by mail to Confederation Centre Art Gallery, 145 Richmond St, Charlottetown, P.E., C1A 1J1.
Deadline for submisssions is Friday, November 29.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Transfering Images

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A selection of politically-charged mixed media paintings by Canadian and Ojibwe artist Carl Beam.

Born on Manitoulin Island, Ojibwe artist Carl Beam (1943-2005) frequently employed photo-transfer techniques juxtaposed with expressive brushwork in paintings that addressed racial disharmony. A great admirer of Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol, Beam placed the liberatory promise of artistic autonomy embodied in the painterly gesture in tension with a proliferation of media and documentary reproductions that referred directly or indirectly to the history of oppression of Indigenous peoples. This selection of Beam’s work from the Gallery’s permanent collection includes almost two dozen collage-based paintings from the early 2000s donated by Toronto collector Milton Winberg.

-Pan Wendt, Curator

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Slowing Down the Look

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This exhibition presents new work developed from a residency in PEI in 2017. The artist’s photographs and objects investigate the relationship between cultural assumptions and the natural world. Supported by Alberta Foundation of the Arts.

In its infancy, photography was conceived as the harnessing of a distinctly natural process of image-making. It was understood to be a literal impression of light, transcending the cultural history of human-made images. This dream, of “sun pictures” that capture the physical and objective means by which nature is revealed to us, persists in the circulating images that filter our subjective experience of the natural world.

In his photo-based installations, Banff-based artist Tyler Los-Jones collapses these two opposed conceptions of photography in meditations on the specifics of a given environment. In Look slowly and all that moves, that environment is the unstable, shifting context of Prince Edward Island. This exhibition focuses on a combination of Island specific gestures of stability Los-Jones found embodied in lichens, marram grass, and fishing nets, all of which can be read as an analogue to the photographic process,

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Trading Card Time!

CCAG: It’s Time Again For The 13th annual Artist Trading Cards Event!

Art Gallery makes call for Artist Trading Cards registrations

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The Confederation Centre Art Gallery (CCAG) is looking for artists of all ages and disciplines, professional and non-professional, to register for its 13th annual Artist Trading Cards event. Artist trading cards (ATC’s) are miniature works of art that can be created with any material imaginable. Cards can be made from paper, wool, wood, clay, and more. 

This year’s registration deadline is Wednesday, July 3. A week after registration, participants will be contacted to confirm the number of cards they are required to create for the event. If 50 people sign up for the program, participants will be requested to create 50 cards. Cards can be produced in editions (a limited number of the same card), series (a set of cards with a unifying theme), or as singular originals.

The main requirement is the size: cards MUST be the same size as modern baseball cards or 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches (6 cm x 9 cm), small enough to fit inside standard card-collector pockets, sleeves or sheets. ATCs must be self-produced. The artist’s name and contact information, as well as the card title and the edition or series number is to be written on the back. 

The 13th annual trading event will be held on Thursday, August 8 at 7 p.m. at the CCAG. Along with the card trading, there will be music and a cash bar. Details on the evening’s program will be announced at a later date.

For more information or to register, please contact Monique Lafontaine by email atmoniquel@confederationcentre.com

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

At the Front Door

Entrance Gallery

Ronald Bloore’s mural White on White is reinstalled in the Entrance Gallery following extensive conservation treatment. It joins Eleanor King’s mural Emerald (Cradled in the Waves) and Paul Griffin’s tree trunk Leviathan.

 

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Ronald Bloore
In 1965, painter Ronald Bloore offered to create a custom mural for the newly built Confederation Centre of the Arts. The mural was completed in 1967 and is comprised of 11 Masonite panels with layers of white oil paint ranging from cool to warm whites, flat to glossy finishes, and smooth to highly textured surfaces. The varying tones and textures, coupled with the changing outside light, create a mural that Bloore felt would “always be alive and moving.”

The conservation of the mural was carried out in 2018. Cracks and losses were consolidated; spot testing was conducted to formulate an appropriate cleaning solution, and areas that could not be safely cleaned were coated with an archival resin and inpainted to match the colour and gloss of the surrounding original paint.

The mural was reinstalled in May 2019 and once again it interacts with the architecture and light, “reflecting something of the outside into the interior.” The changing, raking light provided by the skylight throws Bloore’s welt-like lines and textured planes into sharp relief, presenting White on White in its best light.

Eleanor King
Eleanor King’s monumental wall paintings combine various visual sources and rhetorics. Derived initially from Google satellite views, their subject is how we relate to the land, to its occupation, use and history, how we control, survey and understand the patterns on its surface. With Emerald, she translates the site of rural Prince Edward Island into a hard-edged abstract painting. King’s choice of paint colours is based both on aesthetic decisions and their brand titles, which allude to the commodification of culture, and the historical and political realities that underlie how we visualize the land.

Paul Griffin
The conceptual and physical challenge of Leviathan was to combine a natural element, a large, heavy, forked, elm trunk, with an industrial material—specifically galvanized roofing nails—to create what the artist described as “a hybrid of a sort; an organic machine.” The title, Leviathan, came on completion of the work and alludes to the fearsome sea creature mentioned in the Bible (Job 41). Can a galvanized tree embody both the beauty of nature.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse