House Mix Promises to Intrigue

Toronto Dance Theatre present a mix program of Christopher House’s masterworks

On January 20, Toronto Dance Theatre’s House Mix will celebrate the past, present, and future of Christopher House, one of Canada’s finest choreographers.

Traditional dancers are trained to a degree of obedience, similar to athletes who train in a particular sport. The goal is to perfect the skill and as a result, deliver an exciting and impressive performance for the audience. Contemporary dancers differ slightly in that while perfecting their skills, they’re also developing a sense of play which results in not one performance being the same, similar to sports matches, where anything can happen.

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“It’s one of those things that I think really attracts us to sports,” says House. “Decisions are made in the moment based on what comes up and it’s interesting to create a situation with dance in which that happens.”

House says that in the digital world where much of our lives are dominated by technology, it’s a challenge to encourage people to come out and see live theatre. The advantage that contemporary dance has is that there is something intriguing and dynamic about watching people interact with each other in a live setting.

“Contemporary dance celebrates the body and group of people working together, but what is also interesting are the questions that come up that aren’t fixed in the narrative,” says House. He goes on to explain, “If the choreography is really working it’s making you sit forward in your seat with a sense of curiosity of what’s happening and with pleasure in knowing that you’re participating in the making of meaning.”

House Mix is a retrospective look at the works that House is most proud of and are also interesting for the dancers to perform. He is quick to point out that while the pieces are all different, the opening and closing pieces really take physical risks.

“The pieces have complexity, rhythm, and musical changes. The dancers need to know precisely where everyone else is at all times,” says House. “And let’s be honest, one the great things about live performances is our recognition that there is potential for failure.”

For tickets please visit: http://www.confederationcentre.com/en/show/369-Toronto-Dance-Theatre

 We know you’re going to love this performance so much that we will guarantee your enjoyment or offer a full refund from the box office within the first 20 minutes of show time.

Special thanks are extended to Sobeys, the title sponsor for LIVE @ the Centre! Media sponsors are The Guardian, Ocean 100, and Hot 105.5.

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Aglukark Making One Stop on PEI

‘Winter’s Dream’ Concert tells the story of how her ancestors’ journey has shaped and defined contemporary Inuit

CHARLOTTETOWN – Susan Aglukark is sharing the journey of her Inuit ancestors through her concert “Winters Dream,” which is about to tour Atlantic Canada.

The second stop on that tour is at the Confederation Centre of the Arts
in Charlottetown on Jan. 27.

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The Juno award-winning Canadian Inuk singer-songwriter’s “Winters Dream” concert tells the story of how her ancestors’ journey has shaped and defined contemporary Inuit as they forge a place in the ever-changing Inuit Nunangat/Land of the Inuit.

The 13-date tour visits Atlantic Canada from Jan. 26 to Feb. 15. All shows feature Aglukark and her four-piece band, including drums, bass, piano/keyboards and guitar.

During a career that has spanned more than 25 years, Aglukark’s journey has led her to reflect on who she is, where she came from and the importance of discovery of history, culture and self.

She is the first Inuk artist to win a Juno and a Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for lifetime artistic achievement, she is an officer of the Order of Canada, and holds several honourary doctorate degrees, but Aglukark also acknowledges the path has not been easy.

“Here I was, living a life I never imagined, but I was struggling to understand who I was,” she said. “There was no opportunity growing up to learn about who we were, the Inuit, from our own perspective.

“In essence, we were institutionalized by being told who we were, how we would live and when you are told a story for so long, you learn to believe it.”

During the past 25 years of reflection and songwriting, Aglukark said she kept coming back to one area of profound knowing – the Inuit are an extraordinary people deeply grounded in a culture forged by their Ancestors, their journey is what shaped them.

“Their life experience is the foundation on which our precepts of determination, adaptability and love for life are built, they began the journey to our present-day Nunavut,” added Aglukark.

“Winters Dream,” also the name of her upcoming 10th album, is set for release in April and one she describes as bringing her story full circle – from being caught between two worlds – an indigenous one and a western one – to a place where she is comfortable in her own skin and able to “just be me.”

Tickets for all shows are on sale now. For show and ticket details, visit: susanaglukark.com/tour.

 

Originally posted on The Journal Pioneer.

All in the Family

Every few years, the Confederation Centre gets together with friends and colleagues from other theatres to discuss trends, challenges, and successes in our industry. We finish at the end of the summit inspired and energized.

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Thanks to Fredericton Playhouse, Théâtre Capitol Theatre, Imperial Theatre, Harbourfront Theatre, The Kings Playhouse, Atlantic Presenters Association for their ideas and enthusiasm! #theatrelife

Dancing Up a Storm

Toronto Dance Theatre

January 20, 2018 at 7:30pm at the Confederation Centre
Tickets starting at $25 — MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

Over the past five decades, Toronto Dance Theatre (TDT) has produced an exceptional body of original Canadian choreography and had a major impact on the development of national dance audiences. In its 50th season, TDT showcases Order of Canada member Christopher House and his unique contribution to dance with a mixed program of masterworks from his career.

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This 90-minute program ranges from the kinetic classic Vena Cava (1999), to the contemporary creations Echo Dark 1 (2015) and Martingales (2016). House Mix celebrates the past, present and future of one of Canada’s finest choreographers.

“Some of the best dancers on the planet” -The Globe and Mail

Choreographer Christopher is one of Canada’s “most enduringly inventive choreographers.”
-National Post

Proudly sponsored by Kwik Kopy.

MONEY BACK GUARANTEE – We know you are going to love this performance so much that we will GUARANTEE YOUR ENJOYMENT OR OFFER A FULL REFUND from the box office within the first 30 minutes of showtime.

Holiday Hours By the Hour

Confederation Centre of the Arts will operate at reduced hours between Christmas Eve and January 2, 2017. The Art Gallery, The Showcase gift shop, public library, Mavor’s Restaurant, box office, admin offices, and the Confederation Chamber Exhibition will all follow unique schedules, outlined below.

Holiday-Hours

Confederation Centre will also be opening at 2 p.m. on January 1, 2017 for the Premier’s New Year’s Day Levee at 3 p.m. in Memorial Hall.

 Administrative Offices 
Dec 23-Jan 1: closed
Jan 2: regular hours resume

Box Office
Dec 23: open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (Please note: Centre gift cards available until 9 p.m. at Mavor’s and The Showcase)
Dec 24-Jan 1: closed
Jan 2: regular hours resume

Confederation Centre Art Gallery 
Dec 24-26: closed
Dec 27-30: regular hours (11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Sunday 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
Jan 1-2: closed
Jan 3: regular hours resume

Confederation Centre Public Library 

Dec 24-26: Closed (book returns unavailable)
Dec 27-31: regular hours (10 a.m. – 9 p.m.)
Jan 1: closed
Jan 2: regular hours resume

Confederation Chamber Exhibition (Upper Foyer) 

Dec 23: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Dec 24/31: closed
Jan 6: winter hours resume (Saturdays, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., or by private booking)

Mavor’s Restaurant 

Dec 23: open 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Dec 24-30: closed
Dec 31: open for NYE seating at 7 p.m.
Jan 1: closed
Jan 2: regular winter hours resume

The Showcase Gift Shop 
Dec 23: open 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Dec 24-Jan 1: closed
Jan 2: regular hours resume

Media contact:         
Tanya Wiltshire, Communications Manager, Confederation Centre of the Arts
T: 902.628.6135 (office) E: twiltshire@confederationcentre.com
facebook.com/ConfedCentre | Twitter/Instagram: @confedcentre
For more Centre news: confederationcentre.com/en/news.php

Get in Your Two Cents

Confederation Centre of the Arts launches the 2017 Symons Medal and Lecture Essay Contest

The Symons Medal and Lecture Essay Contest invites PEI students in grades 11 and 12 to submit an original and creative essay on the State of Canadian Confederation. Winning essayists will receive prizes totaling $2,000.

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The 2017 Symons Medal was awarded to the Prime Minister of Canada, the Right Honourable Justin P.J. Trudeau at Confederation Centre of the Arts on November 23. The Symons Medal is one of Canada’s most prestigious honours and recognizes a distinguished person who has made an exceptional contribution to Canadian life.

Students are asked to address the topics and themes presented by the Symons Medalist. The essay should be between 700-1000 words in English or French, on any topic that was discussed in Mr. Trudeau’s lecture or during the question and answer period. The presentation is available online at Confederation Centre’s website.

Students must deliver their submissions by March 23, 2018 via email to khughes@confederationcentre.com, or mail to Kara Hughes, Confederation Centre at 145 Richmond St, Charlottetown PE, C1A 1J1, or hand delivery to the same address.

First place winner will receive $1,000; second place $650; third place $350. The essays will be reviewed by a panel of judges appointed by the Centre.

The winners will be contacted and announced in May 2018.