Tag Archives: Mary Francis Moore

Atlantic Blue Busts Out at the Mack

Full Company Announced for Atlantic Blue at The Charlottetown Festival

New, reimagined production of Tara MacLean’s ‘Atlantic Blue’ opens this Friday at The Mack

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Confederation Centre of the Arts is thrilled to welcome Tara MacLean’s ode to Canada’s East Coast to The Charlottetown Festival. Sponsored by Honibe, Atlantic Blue open this Friday August 2 at 7:30 p.m. and plays Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday nights through September 27, 2019 atThe Mack. The title sponsor of The Charlottetown Festival is CIBC.

In this musical celebration of songwriters, MacLean explores the places and people behind iconic anthems like ‘Sonny’s Dream’, ‘Put Your Hand in the Hand’, ‘Fare Thee Well Love’, and many more. The JUNO-nominated performer and an all-star cast and band pay homage to those fellow musicians who found a way to create beauty from the challenging experiences in their own lives.

To say that anticipation is running hot for this new version of Atlantic Blue would be an understatement, with ticket sales flying all summer long and interested outside parties lining up to explore future touring for the new production.

After two years on offer at The Guild, some changes for the 2019 Festival version of this show include direction from Mary-Francis Moore; major visual design and structural changes; new musical orchestrations and arrangements; and the addition of four orchestra members and five back-up singers, who also provide narration. 

These performers are all Festival favourites, and include Josée Boudreau (the star of 2015’s Evangeline), Alana Hibbert (‘Gertrude’ in this season’s Kronborg), Jacob MacInnis (Kronborg, Jesus Christ Superstar),Andrew McAllister (eighth season, Marcellus in Kronborg), and Brendan Wall (Spoon River, On the Road with Dutch Mason). Each are known for their powerful and signature vocal talents, presenting a stronghold of talent for MacLean and all the musicians to collaborate with.

Like these supporting voices, four members of The Charlottetown Festival Orchestra will also cross the street from regular performance with Anne of Green Gables—The Musical and Kronborg this summer. Joining in at The Mack are: Norman Adams (cello); Isabelle Fournier (violin); Karen Langilee (violin); andSusan Sayle (viola). Craig Fair is Music Director as well as the arranger and orchestrator for Atlantic Blue.

Returning at her side is MacLean’s ace band of Island musicians, known across the region for their individual careers spanning multiple genres and numerous accolades. The group includes band leader Deryl Gallant (bass); Todd MacLean (guitar, sax, piano); Cynthia MacLeod (fiddle, accordion);  and Jon Matthews (guitar/percussion).

The Creative Team for Atlantic Blue includes Fair; Scenic Designer Ken MacDonald; Lighting DesignerJason Hand; Projection Designer Aaron Collier; Costumes from Bonnie Deakin; and choreography fromBrittany Banks.

Adam Brazier is artistic director of The Charlottetown Festival.

Confederation Centre wishes to acknowledge the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Government of P.E.I., and the City of Charlottetown for their continued support.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Hamlet Hits the Road

Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical to Embark on World Tour

Rights for The Charlottetown Festival-made musical acquired for stages across Canada, Australia, U.K. and more;

Final four more performances remain at Confederation Centre

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Confederation Centre of the Arts is excited to learn that David Carver Music has acquired the world-wide touring rights to the acclaimed Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical. The masterful stage musical balances high energy vocal and dance performances and rousing power ballads with songs reaching into the darker emotions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet.

This Saturday July 20, Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical wraps up a successful three week run in Charlottetown, P.E.I. “We are not surprised David Carver Music has picked up this show to go on tour,” says Confederation Centre CEO, Steve Bellamy. “The music is powerful and audiences have absolutely loved it during its run at The Charlottetown Festival. Confederation Centre of the Arts is thrilled that more people will be able to experience this exciting show in Canada and around the world!”

With a bright future ahead, Confederation Centre invites the public to come and celebrate this home-grown musical one last time before it prepares for audiences across the globe. The production, sponsored by SYSCO Food Services, is on stage now in the Homburg Theatre, with select dates and tickets still available. See full calendar and ticket info here. The title sponsor of The Charlottetown Festival is CIBC.

Audiences and critics alike have lauded the epic production, with extensive media attention drawn nationally from The Globe and Mail, National Post, Broadway World, the flagship CBC Radio program q, and the Canadian Press.

For over 30 years, David Carver Music (DCM) has been producing major concert tours with some of the biggest names in music, including Tom Petty, Aerosmith, Sheryl Crow, Bon Jovi, Bob Dylan, Bryan Adams, Brooks and Dunn, Bob Seger, and many more.

DCM’s 2020 tour is planned to visit theatres in Canada, Australia, the U.K., and the U.S. Complete tour dates and production information for this version of the production—dubbed Hamlet: The Rock Musical–will be announced in the months ahead from DCM.

Created by Cliff Jones, Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical first debuted at The Charlottetown Festival in 1974. The rock musical went on to take the nation by storm in the 1970’s and later became the first Canadian musical to play on Broadway, and later Los Angeles. In 2019, Kronborg returned, reimagined and re-orchestrated by Director Mary Francis Moore and Musical Director Craig Fair.

Confederation Centre wishes to acknowledge the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Government of P.E.I., and the City of Charlottetown for their continued support.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Rock the Castle

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There isn’t anything to be or not to be about “Kronborg – The Hamlet Rock Musical” as it kicks off the 55th season at The Charlottetown Festival on Prince Edward Island. It’s all about being, being in front and making it happen. There’s nothing indecisive about Hamlet. He’s got Claudius in his crosshairs nearly from the get-go.

Lawrence Olivier, who directed and starred in an acclaimed movie adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” in 1948, said it is “the story of a man who cannot make up his mind.” The Hamlet of “Kronborg” doesn’t have that problem. His world has been rocked. He has got to make up his mind.

Hamlet’s first song “That It Should Come To This” – sung by Island-born Aaron Hastelow, in a grim dazzling performance of a determined rather than irresolute prince – is performed right after the Ghost King has made himself known to Marcellus and Horatio, and Claudius and Gertrude have made themselves known to Hamlet. He soon has a good idea of the double-dealing he doesn’t know everything about, yet. From that moment on it is hands on the wheel.

The singing is brisk and strong throughout, from the leads to the ensemble. Peter McBoyle, the show’s sound designer, has worked on several musicals at the Confederation Centre, including “Jesus Christ Superstar.” The orchestra, led by Craig Fair, leading the way, gets it done down in the pit, always there as the story unfolds.

Aaron Hastelow gets it done up top up front as Hamlet.

“From seeing a ten-minute segment of the piece in a review show when I was 13-years-old, to now, it’s surreal,” said Aaron⁣. “I need to acknowledge the tireless work of Craig Fair, giving us all this chance, and Cliff Jones for writing some of the most beautiful and memorable melodies. After 45 years, it’s time to share this show with audiences once again. Let’s rock!”

The show starts off with a bang, at the end of the story, as the last of all the main characters, save Horatio, fall down dead, and a black-clad dance troupe of post-modern Greek Furies peck at the fallen, pecking out the vengeance of the Ghost King, Hamlet’s father

“To be or not to be” is never spoken. “Let it be” by The Beatles is invoked. There will be blood is what is on everybody’s lips.

Lawrence Olivier once also said, “Lead the audience by the nose to the thought.” It’s an unfortunate phrase. Who wants to be led by the nose to anything? It’s far better to smell it out for yourself.

“Kronborg” propels the audience headlong to its windswept thought on passages of brisk music and stirring song and able-bodied dance and crafty staging, the twisting plot turning high and low. There are barely two lines of dialogue strung together to transition the songs. It is in some senses like an opera, incorporating all the elements of spoken theater, but sung instead of spoken.

It’s unlike an opera, however, since every word can be understood, it never stands still for long to show off a singer, the songs being embedded in the story, and it is exciting as hell from beginning to end. It bursts with energy.

“It’s a story of family, power, revenge, and sacrifice,” said Adam Brazier, artistic director at the Confederation Centre of the Arts in Charlottetown, where the show was resurrected on their main stage, the Homburg Theatre, playing in repertory alongside both “Anne of Green Gables” and “Mamma Mia!”

It is by far the darker, and arguably the more galvanizing, show in town. There’s something both rockin’ and rotten in Denmark.  It’s been said about rock ‘n’ roll that the devil has all the best tunes and the devil is not going anywhere. It’s also been said that shake rattle and roll and three chords are where the truth is. Whatever the truth is, the show is masterminded, exact and sparkling, never slack, always on the go.

Only the Ghost King takes his time.

The set by scenic designer Brian Smith is German Expressionist, a kind of Cabinet of Dr. Caligari castle, ramparts, a ramp and movable stairs, and arched entranceways. A forest as bleak as prison bars is lowered several times, the trees jagged and menacing, no escape. The rest of the set is minimalist, from the overhead part medieval part modernist chandelier to Gertrude’s dressing room, more suggestion and more effective because of the suggestion.

Nothing in the background gets in the way of the song and dance and narrative in the foreground.

When Honeybelle – Nicola-Dawn Brook in a red beret and man the barricades – and the players of the play within the play belt out the gospel inspired “He Got It In the Ear,” the fulcrum on which the plot rests tilts and everything becomes the gospel truth.

Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Laertes, and Ophelia pour their hearts out in “I Cannot Turn to Love” at the end of Act One. It ends suddenly. The stage goes dark.

You can’t wait for intermission to be over.

The musical was conceived and written in the early 1970s by Cliff Jones, He wrote it while working on the children’s TV show “Mr. Dressup.” A Toronto composer and lyricist, his original “Hamlet: The Musical” has been reprised several times. It played on Broadway in 1976 as “Rockabye Hamlet,” starring the rock star Meat Loaf.

It came back to PEI in concert form in 2017 in at the Indian River Festival. Cliff Jones was in the audience. Following the production at St. Mary’s Church, another concert was performed at the Confederation Centre. Shortly after that the wheels were set in motion to stage the show again.

“It’s back where it began and where, in my mind, it’s always belonged,” Cliff Jones said about the production at the Charlottetown Festival.

“When people on the Island found out that Craig Fair and I were working on “Kronborg” they all had their own story,” said Mary Francis Moore, directing the show.  “Who brought them to the show in 1974? What seat they were sitting in when they heard Cliff’s score. What it was like to work on the first Canadian show to ever make it to Broadway.”

The musical is more than just a piece of the Charlottetown Festival’s history.

“We recognize the significance the piece plays. We have dusted off the pages to create a re-envisioned production that has been fully re-orchestrated and re-arranged – new life breathed into this Canadian classic.”

The composer sat in on some of the rehearsals. “I saw what they were doing with this incredible company and with Craig Fair’s new arrangement and musical direction,” said Cliff Jones. “I’m thrilled. It’s been framing my life for the last 45 years. It’s renewed me.

“The show has always carried a special combination of being a fun, entertaining experience, but also being faithful to Shakespeare’s story.”

Kronborg is a 1400s stronghold castle in Helsingor, Denmark, that became Elsinore in Shakespeare’s late 1500s tragedy in five acts. “Kronborg – The Hamlet Rock Musical” is in two acts. Not a moment is wasted, but all the key moments are there, from the Ghost King to setting the scene of Gertrude and Claudius’s marriage, Claudius getting suspicious and Hamlet’s turmoil, the king’s plotting and the play within the play, Hamlet inadvertently killing Polonius, the banishment and the tragic climax.

There is even some ribald fun along the way, especially when a freshly re-imagined Rosencrantz and Guildenstern make their appearance. They aren’t what you expect. They are nimble and treacherous, like street cats on the prowl.

Claudius is on the prowl, too, as Act Two starts, aware of the grave threat that Hamlet presents, and he conspires with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to solve the problem. Gertrude – played by Alana Hibbert – big league but tottering by then, sings the first of her two affecting prophetic solo’s, “Somebody Wrote the Wrong Words,” as fate speeds up.

Laertes and the full company sing “Eye for an Eye” and the die is cast.

It all comes down to Claudius and Hamlet.

Costume designer Jeff Chief doubles the king and his step-son, both men in black, both lean and mean, although Hamlet is largely in wool-like fabric, softening the effect, keeping him on the side of flesh and blood, while Claudius is largely in leather, making him more reptilian. Claudius is Axl Rose meets Johnny Rotten meets villainy most foul.

The costumes are severe, Edwardian mixed with some Mad Max, while the female leads are often more flowing, leaving trails streaking behind them as they cross the stage. Anachronistic pants are used to good effect, especially when the doomed Ophelia jumps into the lap of the standing Hamlet, straddling him, hanging on for dear life.

Cameron MacDuffie, a veteran of the Centre who describes himself as a man who “lives out past where the sidewalk ends,” plays Claudius as a man who doesn’t give a damn about sidewalks. He is self-aware, as most of Shakespeare’s wrongdoers are, and not beneath self-pity, but his self is more selfish and slyly arrogant than it is anything else. He is the king and the kingdom is his person. Beyond him, nothing matters.

It is an astonishing performance.

When Gertrude sings “No Use Pretending,” which might be one of the best songs of the musical, and is certainly the most moving, near the end of Act Two, she is singing for herself, but for everyone else, too. Polonius and Ophelia are dead. The roof is about to cave in on everyone’s heads.

Fight director Anita Nittoly stages the penultimate sword fight between Hamlet and Laertes Robin Hood-style, lithe and desperate. It is thrilling and horrible, knowing there is poison. When the end comes only Horatio is left standing, and joined by the Ghost King in the ramparts, bears witness to what becomes of treachery and revenge.

“Kronborg – The Hamlet Rock Musical” breathes new life into a play more than four hundred years old, and dirty work as old as time. It resonates because it speaks to our own times.

“A nefarious transition of power has taken place in Denmark and the future is uncertain,” says Adam Brazier. “It is a story that is eerily familiar to the current landscape of the world at large.”

Early in Shakespeare’s play, in Act One, Scene 4, Marcellus says, “Something is rotten in Denmark.” The Hamlet of “Kronborg” doesn’t worry about to be or not to be. Something has got to be done. He rocks the castle to get the rot out. He gets it done.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Kronborg Kicks Off the Show

The Curtain Lifts On The 2019 Charlottetown Festival

Confederation Centre of the Arts’ summer festival launches with Kronborg, Anne™, TD Young Company, and more!

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It’s all systems go at Confederation Centre of the Arts as the staff, cast, orchestra, and crew prepare to launch their 55th theatre season of The Charlottetown Festival, sponsored by CIBC.

Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical :  Opening Friday June 28 in the Homburg Theatre and playing until July 20 is the much anticipated Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical, sponsored by SYSCO Food Services. “This is a ghost story, a story of family, power, revenge, and sacrifice,” remarks Adam Brazier, artistic director.

This electrifying staging of Shakespeare’s famous Hamlet was a breakthrough for Confederation Centre when it first premiered here in 1974, later becoming the first Canadian musical to ever play on Broadway. Originally written and conceived by Cliff Jones, the 2019 production promises to entrance a whole new generation of theatre-lovers. This epic rock’n’roll-powered production is directed by Mary Francis Moore with music direction from Craig Fair.

“This new staging has been fully re-orchestrated and re-arranged musically by Craig Fair—new life breathed into a Canadian classic,” offers Moore. “The inspiration for these changes all come from the beautiful lyrics and melodies Cliff wrote 45 years ago.”

See the full creative team in addendum andread full casting online.

The TD Confederation Centre Young Company : The TD Young Company returns this weekend, kicking off their 2019 season on Saturday June 29 at 12 noon in the Centre’s outdoor amphitheatre. Made up of returning members and new faces, the 2019 Young Company hail from all corners of Canada and collectively speak no less than eight languages.

This summer, the troupe presents Aqsarniit, (or, “the Northern Lights” in Inuktitut), Monday to Saturday at 12 noon from until August 17. This provocative and thoughtful musical weaves music and dance through stories of our collective histories from across Turtle Island.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Kronborg Ready to Be

Complete Casting Announced for ‘Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical’

Epic rock musical telling of ‘Hamlet’ opens Friday, June 21 at Confederation Centre of the Arts

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A ghostly visitor with a secret; a son devastated by loss; a deadly sword duel – and the most famous question in all of drama (“To be or not to be…”).

These are just some of the reasons why Shakespeare’s iconic tragedy turned musical will hold you spellbound in the Homburg Theatre. Add in a thrilling rock opera score, a full orchestra, and a cast of 28 stellar Canadian actors, and you have all the makings of an intoxicating musical experience.

“This is a ghost story, a story of family, power, revenge, and sacrifice,” says Adam Brazier, artistic director of Confederation Centre. “As the great actor and director Lawrence Olivier said; it is the story of a man who cannot make up his mind.”

Opening June 21 at Confederation Centre of the Arts, the musical is sponsored by SYSCO Food Services. Playing until July 20, Kronborg returns to The Charlottetown Festival, 45 years after first mesmerizing theatre-goers in 1973-74.

The musical was a breakthrough for Confederation Centre and the country, becoming the first Canadian musical to play on Broadway in 1975. Originally written and conceived by Cliff Jones, the 2019 production promises to entrance a whole new generation of theatre-lovers. This re-envisioned production is directed by Mary Francis Moore with music direction from Craig Fair.

“Craig, Cliff, and I recognize the significance the piece plays, not only in the history of the Festival, but also in the history of new musicals in Canada,” offers Moore, who has been working with her artistic team to redevelop the musical for two years.

“This new production has been fully re-orchestrated and re-arranged musically—new life breathed into a Canadian classic,” she continues. “The inspiration for these changes all come from the beautiful lyrics and melodies Cliff wrote 45 years ago.”

Moore and Brazier are thrilled to now reveal complete casting for the epic musical. Starring Aaron Hastelow as Hamlet, the production includes:

Kimberly-Ann Truong as Ophelia, Cameron MacDuffee as Claudius,

Alanna Hibbert as Gertrude, Brendan Wall as the Ghost King,

Andrew McAllister as Marcellus, Jacob MacInnis as Horatio,

Teddy Moynihan as Rosencrantz, Nicole Norsworthy as Guildenstern,

Gray Monczka as Laertes, Michael Torontow as Polonius, and Nicola-Dawn Brook as Honeybelle.

See the complete cast and creative team listing in addendum. Confederation Centre wishes to acknowledge the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Government of P.E.I., and the City of Charlottetown for their continued support.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

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PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Casting Announced for 2019 Charlottetown Festival

Select Casting Announced for Mamma Mia! and Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical

The 2019 Charlottetown Festival launching 50% off sale, November 17 to December 1

Artistic Director Adam Brazier, on behalf of Confederation Centre of the Arts, has announced select casting for The 2019 Charlottetown Festival. Sponsored by CIBC, the Festival includes six productions and runs June 28 to September 28.

Rebecca Poff and Katie Kerr will star as mother and daughter Donna and Sophie in Mamma Mia!, a co-production with the Grand Theatre in London, playing in the Homburg Theatre August 9 to September 27. Poff turned heads in the Festival’s  2018 concert performance of The House of Martin Guerre and also appeared in Jesus Christ Superstar and Anne of Green Gables—The Musical™. A native of Sudbury, Ontario, Poff has performed throughout the continent, including in the Canadian National Tour of The Phantom of the Opera and the U.S. National/Broadway tours of Show Boat.

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Kerr returns to the Greek Islands of Mamma Mia!, having previously starred as Sophie in the blockbuster 2016 production in Charlottetown, as well as with two other theatres. Kerr’s other credits consist of multiple roles in Anne of Green Gables—The Musical™, including the title role from 2013-14, and in the world premiere of Evangeline. “Sophie is really the driving force in Mamma Mia!” says Brazier, who will once again direct the musical. “It’s no wonder Katie has since played the role across Canada; she is a tour de force as Sophi

The Festival’s new production of Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical runs June 28 until July 20 in the Homburg Theatre. Directed by the Festival’s associate artistic, Mary Francis Moore, the powerhouse rock musical is an electric experience, following Hamlet’s quest for vengeance upon his uncle Claudius for killing his father. Aaron Hastelow stars as Hamlet and will also appear in Mamma Mia! as Sophie’s beau, Skye. 

Brazier is pleased to welcome back Festival favourite Cameron MacDuffee opposite Hastelow as Claudius, King of Denmark. MacDuffee recently appeared as a scene-stealing King Herod in the Festival’s Jesus Christ Superstar, and has performed across Canada, including four seasons at Shaw Festival. His Charlottetown highlights include turns in Evangeline, Ring of Fire, and On the Road with Dutch Mason. He will also reprise his role as Harry in Mamma Mia! at the 2019 Festival.

Making her mainstage debut in Kronborg—The Hamlet Rock Musical will be Kimberly Truong as Ophelia. Truong hails from Prince Rupert, B.C. and was previously part of the Confederation Centre Young Company in Les Feux Follets. She has appeared in productions of Les Misérables, West Side Story, and A Chorus Line. Last year, she made her Broadway debut in the celebrated revival of Miss Saigon. “It is thrilling to have Kimberly back at The Charlottetown Festival,“ remarks Brazier. ”She has an extraordinary voice and an undeniable presence onstage.”

The other big news is that the Festival is once again offering a ‘50% Off Sale’ ticket sale for the 2019 Festival. This sale is a favourite for Islanders searching for tickets every summer and is on sale for a limited time only. From November 17 to December 1 these can be purchased at the Centre box office, online, or by phone at 1 (902) 566-1267 or 1 (800) 565-0278. This sale is available for Founders’ Circle members as of November 16.

Additional casting, including a new leading star for Anne of Green Gables—The Musical™ and a new Gilbert, will be announced in the months ahead.

Bound for Calgary

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The TD Confederation Centre Young Company is hitting the road again. After a busy 2017 season that saw two troupes crisscross the country, the 2018 company has been invited to perform at the Future of Child Welfare in Canada: National Child Welfare Conference 2018, October 23 to 26 in Calgary, Alberta.

The conference is a Canadian first that brings together the Provincial and Territorial Directors of Child Welfare with the Annual Prairie Child Welfare Consortium conference, and the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Social Work. A central theme is the need to address child welfare within an Indigenous context and to consider ways to move forward in light of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommendations. It is estimated that nearly half of Canadian children in foster care, under the age of 14 are Indigenous, and that, overall, Indigenous children comprise 30 to 40 percent of children in care.

Thanks to the generous support of Indigenous Services Canada, Confederation Centre is bringing 11 company members to Calgary, all of whom appeared in The Charlottetown Festival production of Aqsarniit (“awe-saw-nee”) this summer. These young artists come from across Canada and will be performing excerpts from Aqsarniit, the Inuktitut word used to describe the northern lights. This high-energy musical re-examines Canada’s past through the varied lenses of today’s youth and shares some of the stories they hope will be told in the future.

“Confederation Centre is at the forefront of engaging in a national dialogue and this event is reflective of the art we are creating at the Festival and the Centre,” says Mary Francis Moore, associate artistic director of The Charlottetown Festival. “It is an honour to be invited.”

The Young Company will have the opportunity to perform for an audience of stakeholders from every province and territory. The troupe will appear as part of the opening keynote address and just before the closing keynote from Senator Murray Sinclair, former chairman of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. During the opening keynote, the troupe will perform excerpts from Aqsarniit and also participate in an audience Q+A with company members discussing what they wish to see for Canada’s future.

 “We are continuously proud of the work of our emerging artists and creative team with the Young Company,” says Steve Bellamy, CEO of Confederation Centre. “The National Child Welfare Conference is an important new initiative and we are humbled that our musical production, which speaks to the realities of Canadian history and this country’s efforts towards Truth and Reconciliation, can contribute to these proceedings in such a meaningful way.”

For more on this inspiring conference, visit their website. The Centre wishes to acknowledge the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Government of P.E.I., and the City of Charlottetown for their continued support. The title sponsor of The Charlottetown Festival is CIBC. Program sponsor for the Young Company is TD.