Tag Archives: Victoria Playhouse

The Songs That Make It happen

Victoria Playhouse presentsThe Songs of Anne & Gilbert – The Musical The Songs of Anne & Gilbert will play at Victoria Playhouse on September 12th, 13th, 19th and 20th. This beloved musical, which has been presented by The Guild in Charlottetown since 2013, had its world premiere on our stage in 2005.
The concert production is conceived and created by acclaimed Music Director Lisa MacDougall, whose storied national career includes twelve years as Rita MacNeil’s music director, band leader, and pianist.There will be four performances of The Songs of Anne & Gilbert at Victoria Playhouse: September 12th and 19th at 7:30pm and September 13th and 20th at 2:00pm. 
Click Here to Purchase Tickets! Or call our Box Office at 1-800-925-2025. We are observing COVID-19 safety protocols. Physical distancing will be in place in the theatre and we strongly recommended you wear your mask until seated. Thank you for helping us open the theatre safely! Want to make it dinner & a show? Our friends at The Landmark Oyster House will be open for four weekends starting on the 11th of September.Call 902-658-2286 to book your table!

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre, Confederation Centre for the Arts, Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Ebb & Flow on PEI

Ebb-Flow-Logo

Ebb & Flow: Tides of Settlement on PEI 
Coming off a successful run in Charlottetown, this fascinating performance tells stories of the indigenous Mi’kmaq and the many waves of  settlers on PEI by musicians, singers, storytellers and writers.
Featuring Teresa Kuo, Tiffany Liu, Julie Pellissier-Lush, Amanda Mark, Laurie Murphy, Vince the Messenger, and Haley Zavo and a special guest for each performance!
Ebb & Flow “integrates multimedia and multicultural with the spirit of a down-home family ceilidh” – Ivy Wigmore, The Buzz.
We have a limited number of tickets available. Book now to avoid disappointment!

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse
Click Here to Purchase Tickets!

Or call our Box Office at 1-800-925-2025.

We are observing COVID-19 safety protocols. Physical distancing will be in place in the theatre and we strongly recommended you wear your mask until seated. Thank you for helping us open the theatre safely!

The Hall is Alive

117764490_10157255990770598_7551184050300415141_o

We welcomed three of the Island’s most talented singer-songwriters to the Victoria Playhouse for the last two days. They were making a video on our stage. It was wonderful to hear live music in our beautiful hall again and we look forward to more events happening soon. Thanks Catherine MacLellan, Tim Chaisson and Rachel Beck for choosing to come to Victoria.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

A Wayward Feather

117292526_10157240932245598_1362762877334230270_o.jpg

This summer at the Victoria Playhouse we are reaching out to friends who have worked with us in past seasons and asked them to share their stories of the time spent with us here at the Playhouse.

Trilby Jeeves performed with us for three seasons in the eighties. She played the female lead roles in ‘Talley’s Folly’, ‘Sinners’ and ‘Seamarks’.
Here is an excerpt from her reminiscences The complete story will appear on our new website coming soon.

“The best feeling was being on that lovely stage when the audience couldn’t stop laughing. My advice from the comedy ‘Sinners’ that my friend, Michel Houde, and I were in, is to not wear a costume with lots of feathers. Seeing one sticking out from Michel’s sweaty forehead as he made a “serious” phone call took great effort for me to not break out laughing. He had no idea it was there. He wondered why I whacked him in the head as we ran “up the stairs” (back stage) to return to the bedroom set. That feather had to go!

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Kisses All Around

109099864_10157189075290598_3351709538704812164_o.jpg

Remember this uplifting production at the Victoria Playhouse? KISS THE MOON, KISS THE SUN by Norm Foster opened our 2014 season. Directed by Ted Price with scenic design by Scott MacConnell and featuring Jeremy Saunders, Cathy Grant, Rebecca Griffin, Mark Fraser and Mark Stevenson.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

The Famous Fake Turkey

107048583_10157169808990598_8401072240013014817_o

Here is the famous prop turkey in use …HAVING HOPE AT HOME – 2013 at the Victoria Playhouse. Directed by Ron Irving and starring Breanna Moore, Mark Fraser, Sharlene MacLean, Jack Wynters, Cathy Grant and Mark Stevenson. Turkey created by Jen Brown and photos by Pam Price. It takes a village…

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Cleaning House

106392213_10157147954830598_8781433589763253636_o

You never know what will turn up when you start cleaning out the props room at the Victoria Playhouse. Anyone for a stuffed turkey or a fish skeleton? Or a shark cruisin’ the hostas? With good sports Amy Kern and Emily Smith.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Down the Street

104469525_10157117178685598_5989693397792841760_o

Matt and Sheldon are enjoying Island Chocolate’s famous deck, down the street from the Victoria Theatre, this morning. This beloved shop opened today for the season with plans in place for physical distancing.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

Off to Work We Go

103015561_10157091207675598_4291973162888880310_o

We are excited and thankful to be back to work in the beautiful Victoria Playhouse. While we are not able to welcome our patrons back yet we have a number of ‘some day we are going to get around to it’ maintenance jobs that we will be completing while observing recommended Covid 19 protocols.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse

This is So True!

 

91377461_10156871891705598_6554687772408414208_o

This is so important and so true!

For a few years now, the actions from Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) have resolutely turned towards digital technology. While the theatre community recognizes the undeniable value of these tools when it comes to production and outreach, it is quite a different matter when it comes to creation.

Since the beginning of the crisis, an optimistic discourse, although unfortunately misleading, is gaining momentum: that the survival of the arts will require they move online. It is true that virtual spaces of togetherness comfort us. We want to believe that they will adequately replace live arts, if not how can we possibly envision the months, or perhaps years, to come? However, to better participate in the current transformation of the world, we must first be honest: the direct nature of the performing arts is, in general, incompatible with digital arts.

Perhaps it is the stunning prospect of a lasting no man’s land of live performance that has caused so many voices to emerge to sing the praises of our digital salvation. Liza Frulla and Louise Beaudoin, two strong advocates for arts and culture, said in an interview with Radio-Canada that the artistic community was going to have to reinvent itself through digital technology. In a blog post published on April 19th in La Presse, Simon Brault, director of the CCA, invites us “to consider the future with a real desire to experiment and innovate” and encourages “the rapid and widespread adoption of digital tools.” He reiterated his position, still in La Presse, insisting on the fact that “we need to encourage the conversation about the digital […].” The CCA has joined forces with Radio-Canada/CBC to offer the Digital Originals program to finance the creation or adaptation of digital works.

The problem is not in creating such programs, nor in the faith expressed in artists. The problem is in the monolithic character of the statement itself. We are puzzled by this tendency to believe that practicing one art form means practicing all the arts forms and that it is therefore enough for artists of all disciplines to migrate online to continue to exist. Each sector requires its own expertise. A dancer is not a visual artist, who in turn is not a film director. Some artists happily choose to adopt digital tools in their practice and that is exciting and commendable. However, each artistic practice must remain radically free. It is precisely this freedom that we are demanding today: the freedom to remain faithful to the performing arts. Not because they are better than digital arts, but because they are inherently different in nature, and this specificity must be preserved.

Theatre is the art of gathering. Without direct encounter with the audience, theatre does not exist. Without this delicious and dangerous awareness of the fallibility of the humans there, in front of you, theatre does not exist. Without the mystical awareness of sharing a unique, fleeting moment, theatre does not exist. Its existential quality is based on its ephemerality. Theatre is what happens between humans gathering together. Theatre is built on the ideas and feelings shared between souls gathering together. We build multifaceted universes, integrate new technologies, we sometimes collaborate with other artistic disciplines, but none of this affects the essential nature of the performing arts, which fulfill the prehistoric need of humans to be among their own, to observe oneself in the cathartic presence of fellow humans.

In these unprecedented times, digital technology is a Band-Aid solution that we appreciate for what it is: a way to keep in touch with our audiences and offer them some substitutes for the shows they are waiting for. Some encouraging and promising initiatives will last. Others are created to be temporary, to keep our heads above water while the storm passes, which may take a long time.

Without knowing everything about the scenarios of deconfinement, we already know that the distancing measures will need to be upheld. It will be a long time before can gather again in a performance venue. The theatre community’s priority is undoubtedly to show solidarity, follow the rules of public health and wait as long as it takes before we can reopen our doors safely.

We are only at the beginning of the crisis. It is therefore astonishing to read Simon Brault rejoicing in the fact that “[…] But the shock of these changes has not led to the disaster we anticipated. Within days, hundreds of artists were broadcasting their creations from their homes. How is it possible, right now, to affirm the avoidance of disaster? And is this digital tidal wave really proof that artists have found a way to make up for the closures of all performance venues? A spontaneous initiative born out of shock does not guarantee the will or the capacity of an artist to pursue this path, an almost systematically unremunerated path, it must be said. From their home studios, encased in a solitude that is the opposite of their practice, many artists are currently worrying that the theatre itself will be swept away by the pandemic after millennia of resistance. Many feel that their duty, at the moment, is to listen attentively and not to succumb to their reflex to produce by quickly learning the basics of digital technology. Some will have the opportunity to finally take this time of isolation for the development, research and creation that is constantly neglected. Some will perhaps succeed in perceiving deep things, which are otherwise hidden from us, and transform them into works to be deployed, one day, on stage.

The theatre will survive this crisis. It will standby. It will endeavor to face its fear of emptiness. It will be patient, but if necessary, it will imagine unexpected ways to bring us together other than through our screens. It will be performed in front of an audience of twelve, will disperse in a football stadium and will distribute astronaut suits to its audience, thirsty for human proximity. It doesn’t matter: as long as we are together.

And then, when the time comes, the theatre will open its doors wide and resume its role where it left off. We do not want a digital exit from the crisis. It is through direct contact with others that we will find that strength that we have missed so much.

This letter is co-signed by the members of the board of directors of the Conseil québécois du théâtre:

Charles Bender, Isabelle Boisclair, Lesley Bramhill, Mireille Camier, Sophie Devirieux, Geoffrey Gaquère, Maude Gareau, Mayi-Eder Inchauspé, Albert Kwan, Hubert Lemire, Mathieu Marcil, Dany Michaud, Mathieu Murphy-Perron, Jane Needles, Solène Paré, Édith Patenaude, Olivier Sylvestre, Leïla Thibeault Louchem, Pierre Tremblay, Anne Trudel and France Villeneuve.

PEI Professional Theatre Network

28660348_162333201093170_735205771249634989_n

PEI Theatre is the Guild, Harbourfront Theatre,
Confederation Centre for the Arts,
Watermark Theatre, and the Victoria Playhouse